Taxidromikon Postcards & Printed Ephemera

This shows the dredging operation on the Little Deschutes River near the J. N. Masten Sawmill about eight miles south of La Pine. The dredger is shown in the distance, and it is shown up close in a previous post here. 

This shows the dredging operation on the Little Deschutes River near the J. N. Masten Sawmill about eight miles south of La Pine. The dredger is shown in the distance, and it is shown up close in a previous post here. 

This is George Mayweather in La Pine. He was probably an important player in the building of the canals; but I have not located the source in which he is mentioned, so I shall continue the search and edit this post later. This postcard is part of several by different photographers working in the area documenting what they hoped would be a boom in railroad, agriculture and population. The first two didn’t come, and the last is now beginning to happen a century later! 

This is George Mayweather in La Pine. He was probably an important player in the building of the canals; but I have not located the source in which he is mentioned, so I shall continue the search and edit this post later. This postcard is part of several by different photographers working in the area documenting what they hoped would be a boom in railroad, agriculture and population. The first two didn’t come, and the last is now beginning to happen a century later! 

One more photo of La Pine canals ca. 1910. These cards seem to be part of a historic collection assembled by someone familiar with the area and with the history of irrigation in Central Oregon. Getting water to the dry areas for agriculture and water rights were a big speculation at the time.

One more photo of La Pine canals ca. 1910. These cards seem to be part of a historic collection assembled by someone familiar with the area and with the history of irrigation in Central Oregon. Getting water to the dry areas for agriculture and water rights were a big speculation at the time.

Here is a splendid view of how the Central Oregon Irrigation canals were made using horse-drawn Fresno graders to heap the pumice soil up into walled mounds on either side of the canal; here the mound on the right is natural from the hillside from which it is being carved. Of the several cards I have of this work none is signed, although there seems to be a definite record of the project. They may have been taken by Bruno Bakowski who was in the area of La Pine and Rosland at the time of construction. This was a huge undertaking, and the only power equipment I can find was used in conjunction with existing water channels such as the Little Deschutes. I hope to research this project at the Oregon Historical Society in January. This particular canal in the La Pine area is probably the W R Lateral Canal which comes from Masten Butte about seven miles southwest of La Pine. The view would probably be 1910. 

Here is a splendid view of how the Central Oregon Irrigation canals were made using horse-drawn Fresno graders to heap the pumice soil up into walled mounds on either side of the canal; here the mound on the right is natural from the hillside from which it is being carved. Of the several cards I have of this work none is signed, although there seems to be a definite record of the project. They may have been taken by Bruno Bakowski who was in the area of La Pine and Rosland at the time of construction. This was a huge undertaking, and the only power equipment I can find was used in conjunction with existing water channels such as the Little Deschutes. I hope to research this project at the Oregon Historical Society in January. This particular canal in the La Pine area is probably the W R Lateral Canal which comes from Masten Butte about seven miles southwest of La Pine. The view would probably be 1910. 

While I was collecting cards from La Pine, which are very rare under any circumstances, I ran across this postal history cover quite separate from the cards. It is connected to the Masten Lumber Company family, and it is clearly marked Rosland, not La Pine, in the address and the receiving cancel on the verso. It is noted “in care of J. N. Masten.” The Rosland post office was established in 1897 on the Pengra Ranch on the Central Oregon Military Road. It was also on the stage road from Bend to Fort Klamath.This particular location was in operation from 1904 to September 21, 1910 when it was replaced with a post office in La Pine on what would become the Pengra-Huntington Stage Road. 

Here are company photos of the J. N. Masten Lumber Company.

Here are the cabins used by the workers at J. N. Masten ca. 1910.

Here are the cabins used by the workers at J. N. Masten ca. 1910.

This is a Bruno Bakowski photo of the J. N. Masten Lumber Company mill at La Pine; actually La Pine wasn’t established until 1910, and the mill predates that by some time. The area was then called Rosland which was on the shallow area of the Little Deschutes River. Bakowski came from Eastern Oregon and settled in Bend about 1910, when he began using Oregon Art Company which gradually supplanted his name.He was a contemporary of the other great Central Oregon postcard photographer Ole Hedlund of Madras, and their work sometimes overlapped. 

This is a Bruno Bakowski photo of the J. N. Masten Lumber Company mill at La Pine; actually La Pine wasn’t established until 1910, and the mill predates that by some time. The area was then called Rosland which was on the shallow area of the Little Deschutes River. Bakowski came from Eastern Oregon and settled in Bend about 1910, when he began using Oregon Art Company which gradually supplanted his name.He was a contemporary of the other great Central Oregon postcard photographer Ole Hedlund of Madras, and their work sometimes overlapped. 

This is the view of the log bridge over the Deschutes River at Rosland. The people on the bridge are probably men from the J. N. Masten Lumber Company; one of their log loading areas from the river was immediately to the right in the photo. Pringle Falls is to the left, and the river loses its tranquil nature from that point on. Serious timber was on the west bank behind the camera, and lesser lodge pole pine in the forest beyond. I will soon post some cards showing the actual operations of the J. N. Masten Lumber operation.

This is the view of the log bridge over the Deschutes River at Rosland. The people on the bridge are probably men from the J. N. Masten Lumber Company; one of their log loading areas from the river was immediately to the right in the photo. Pringle Falls is to the left, and the river loses its tranquil nature from that point on. Serious timber was on the west bank behind the camera, and lesser lodge pole pine in the forest beyond. I will soon post some cards showing the actual operations of the J. N. Masten Lumber operation.

This is an example of the Deschutes in the area of the J. N. Masten Lumber Company. Rosland was on the Pengra Ranch, and it was replaced by the establishment of La Pine in 1910. La Pine was established further east in anticipation of the railroad which reached Bend in October, 1911; but it was not to be for La Pine, as the railroad didn’t arrive until 1931. La Pine did find itself on the Pengra-Huntington Stage Road from Bend to Klamath Falls with a branch just south of present day La Pine to Fort Rock and Lakeview. The stage road later became the Dalles-California Highway and eventually Oregon Highway 97. The name La Pine is commonly stated as being a reflection of the vast amount of pine trees native to the area; the word in French for pine tree is, however, actually Le Pin; La Pine is actually the penis. The founders evidently didn’t do well in first year French, although I have never seen this mentioned anywhere. 

This is an example of the Deschutes in the area of the J. N. Masten Lumber Company. Rosland was on the Pengra Ranch, and it was replaced by the establishment of La Pine in 1910. La Pine was established further east in anticipation of the railroad which reached Bend in October, 1911; but it was not to be for La Pine, as the railroad didn’t arrive until 1931. La Pine did find itself on the Pengra-Huntington Stage Road from Bend to Klamath Falls with a branch just south of present day La Pine to Fort Rock and Lakeview. The stage road later became the Dalles-California Highway and eventually Oregon Highway 97. The name La Pine is commonly stated as being a reflection of the vast amount of pine trees native to the area; the word in French for pine tree is, however, actually Le Pin; La Pine is actually the penis. The founders evidently didn’t do well in first year French, although I have never seen this mentioned anywhere.